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Dr. Stefania Maggi

Immediate Past President

Dr. Maggi is a Geriatrician and Epidemiologist with expertise in both areas of Clinical Geriatrics and Epidemiology of Aging.

Languages : English

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Maggi is a Geriatrician and Epidemiologist with expertise in both areas of Clinical Geriatrics and Epidemiology of Aging. Her research focuses on the epidemiology of aging and on the analysis of the impact that lifelong health promotion and disease prevention programs have on healthy aging.She is a Board-Certified Geriatrician (University of Padua, Italy) and also obtained a Master in Public Health in Epidemiology in 1987 and completed a two-year Post-Doctoral Training in Epidemiology, both at the Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, MD, USA. Dr. Maggi was the Coordinator of the Program for Research on Aging of WHO, from 1990 to 1993, based at NIA, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.She is currently working as Research Director at the CNR Aging Branch-Institute of Neuroscience in Padua and is the Director of the CNR Project on Aging, involving 22 multidisciplinary, research centers in Italy. Over the year, Dr. Maggi has created a large international network, leading to the implementation of cross-national research projects.Since 2001 she is a member of the Board of Directors, American Federation for Aging (AFAR), New York, NY, US, and since 2010 Director General of the Mediterranean Diet Foundation.Dr. Maggi has been the Academic Director and is currently the President of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS). She is the author of about 300 publications in international journals of Medicine and Public Health and is Editor in Chief of Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.

Articles

Metabolic syndrome, mild cognitive impairment, and progression to dementia. The Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging
Neurology of Aging

2011We investigated the relationship of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components with incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its progression to dementia in a large longitudinal Italian population-based sample with a 3.5-year follow-up. A total of 2097 participants from a sample of 5632 65–84-year-old subjects from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging were evaluated. MetS was defined according to the Third Adults Treatment Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. MCI, dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) were classified using current published criteria. Among MCI patients those with MetS (N = 49) had a higher risk of progression to dementia (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.30–14.82) compared with those without MetS (N = 72). After a multivariate adjustment, the risk in MCI patients with MetS approximately doubled (multivariate adjusted HR, 7.80, 95% CI 1.29–47.20) compared with those MCI without MetS. Finally, among non-cognitively impaired individuals there were no significant differences in risks of developing MCI in those who were affected by MetS (N = 608) in comparison with those without MetS (N = 837), as well as excluding those individuals with undernutrition or low inflammatory status with or without undernutrition. In our population, among MCI patients the presence of MetS independently predicted an increased risk of progression to dementia over 3.5 years of follow-up.

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The role of impulsivity in self-mutilators, suicide ideators and suicide attempters — A study of 1265 male incarcerated individuals
Journal of Affective Disorders

2010We explored differences between high and low-impulsive incarcerated individuals in the context of lifetime self-mutilation, suicide ideation and suicide attempt.

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Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Vascular Dementia. The Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging
Journal of Neurology, Neuroscience & Psychiatry

2009We investigated the relationship of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components with incident dementia in a prospective population-based study with a 3.5-year follow-up.

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The role of blood pressure in cognitive impairment in an elderly population
Journal of Hypertension

1997The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional relationship between arterial blood pressure and cognitive impairment in a group of elderly subjects, controlling for such confounding variables as age, education, depression, drug use and antihypertensive treatment.

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Area of Expertise

Ageing Organization

COVID-19

Clinical Geriatrics

Coronavirus

Disease Prevention

Education

Epidemiology of Aging

Research

Affiliation

European Union Geriatric Medicine Society

Industry

Medical/Dental Practice

Research

Education/Learning

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